310 items found

  • Mikiya Kakehashi – Company Dancer | Los Angeles Ballet

    2021/2022 Season > Dancers > ​ Mikiya Kakehashi Hometown Ibaraki, Japan Schools Ballettschule Theater Basel, Switzerland Companies Ballet de Barcelona Los Angeles Ballet 1st Next Dancer Previous Dancer

  • Celebrating Season 10 | Los Angeles Ballet

    Celebrating Season 10 July 1, 2015 2015-2016 Season Opens on October 3, 2015 Los Angeles, xx, 2015 - Los Angeles Ballet Co-Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary celebrate the Great Romantics for LAB’s tenth season. The 2015-2016 season includes four full-length story ballets - Giselle, Don Quixote, The Nutcracker and Romeo and Juliet. The season will include new productions of Don Quixote and Romeo and Juliet and the return of the company’s critically-acclaimed productions of Giselle and The Nutcracker. With the exception of Romeo and Juliet, all are choreographed by Artistic Directors Christensen and Neary. Christensen and Neary have chosen Frederick Ashton’s Romeo and Juliet, which will be a Los Angeles premiere. Continuing LAB’s mission to offer world-class professional ballet to greater Los Angeles, its programs are performed at LAB’s home theaters: UCLA’s Royce Hall, Glendale’s Alex Theatre, Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge, Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center, and the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. “As we embark upon our tenth season and to celebrate this milestone, we thought that this was the perfect time to share the Romantics with the city,” said Christensen, LAB’s co-artistic director. “Thanks to the support of our patrons, the company has seen thrilling growth over the last nine years. Our dancers have grown artistically and technically, and our audience has grown across the city,” said Neary, LAB’s co-artistic director. LAB opens the season with Giselle (October/November 2015). Premiered by Los Angeles Ballet in 2011, this ethereal and haunting masterwork is the embodiment of the Romantic ideal. The holidays welcome back LAB’s popular The Nutcracker set in 1913 Los Angeles (December 2015), with additional matinees offering more opportunities to see this family favorite and enjoy Tchaikovsky’s beloved music. Don Quixote, based on Cervantes' iconic Spanish novel and choreographed by Los Angeles Ballet's Christensen and Neary (after Petipa), weaves a splendid tapestry of love, illusion, daring and adventure. Gypsies, matadors, and windmills result in a profusion of excitement, humor, and family fun. To close the season, Los Angeles Ballet makes history as the first American company to present the great choreographer Frederick Ashton's Romeo and Juliet. "We are thrilled to be the first American company to perform this tremendous piece, a work of classical genius," says Christensen. Shakespeare's timeless tragedy of star-crossed lovers is unforgettably expressed in dance, drama, and Prokofiev's timeless score. About Los Angeles Ballet Founded in 2004 by Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, and Executive Director Julie Whittaker, Los Angeles Ballet is known for its superb stagings of the Balanchine repertory, stylistically meticulous classical ballets, and its commitment to new works. LAB has become recognized as a world-class ballet company in nine seasons, presenting 28 productions encompassing 50 works, including 15 commissioned world premieres. Los Angeles Ballet ‘tours’ throughout LA County, regularly appearing at four venues. Since its inception in 2006, LAB’s Power of Performance (POP!) program has provided thousands of free tickets to underserved or disadvantaged children, seniors, veterans, and their families. LAB's A Chance to Dance Community Days outreach program was launched in October 2012. About Thordal Christensen Among Thordal Christensen’s many credentials are an impressive performing career, successful leadership of one of the world's major ballet companies, critically applauded original choreography, and a proven commitment to dance education. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Christensen received his ballet training at The Royal Danish Ballet School and at the School of American Ballet in New York City before a performance career that included the Royal Danish Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Christensen then returned to Denmark where he was Artistic Director of the Royal Danish Ballet. This blend of Bournonville and Balanchine tradition is one of the defining themes of his career, and has shaped the unique artistic vision that Christensen, along with his wife Colleen Neary, bring to Los Angeles Ballet. In 2002, he was made Knight of the Dannebrog by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. About Colleen Neary Colleen Neary brings to Los Angeles Ballet the benefits of her vast experience as one of George Balanchine's quintessential ballerinas. In her experience as a dancer, teacher, and ballet mistress, she also worked closely with other luminaries of 20th century dance, including Rudolf Nureyev, Maurice Béjart, and Jiří Kylián. Born in Miami, Florida and trained at The School of American Ballet, Neary danced in New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine, then for Maurice Béjart's Ballet du XXième Siecle, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Neary was personally selected by Balanchine to teach his choreography to major companies all over the world as a repetiteur for The George Balanchine Trust. ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Dance Review: Los Angeles Ballet's Balanchine Program | Los Angeles Ballet

    Dance Review: Los Angeles Ballet's Balanchine Program February 22, 2010 The production was from the Louisville Ballet. Ben Pilat provided the dramatic lighting. L.A. Ballet company co-director Thordal Christensen tweaked the traditional Coralli-Perrot-Petipa choreography, cutting some virtuosic demands, adding some mime, and inventing a poor couple who provide their cottage as the prince’s local digs. Christensen’s wife and company co-director, Colleen Neary, enacted Giselle’s mother, Berthe, with fuss and worry. Los Angeles Times by Laura Bleiberg DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Shelling Out Dividends, Los Angeles Ballet's Version of The Nutcracker is a bright season opener... | Los Angeles Ballet

    Shelling Out Dividends, Los Angeles Ballet's Version of The Nutcracker is a bright season opener... December 15, 2008 James and the Sylph soon meet their destruction, however, James has deeply though mindlessly offended the witch Madge earlier during the wedding day. Now, seeking to bring his ideal Sylph into his arms, he drapes a veil he doesn’t know has been poisoned by Madge over the Sylph’s shoulders and winds it around her arms. The Sylph immediately loses her wings, comes to earth and quickly dies. James is stunned and collapses in grief. Los Angeles Times by Victoria Looseleaf DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • LAB Dancer Elizabeth Claire Walker featured in Harvard Magazine | Los Angeles Ballet

    LAB Dancer Elizabeth Claire Walker featured in Harvard Magazine June 1, 2016 "...A native of New York City, [Elisabeth Claire Walker] studied at American Ballet Theatre’s elite Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School as a teenager. Her senior year of high school—even after she’d been accepted to Harvard—was spent attending massive cattle-call auditions for professional companies. Just when she was about to give up, she spotted a notice for Los Angeles Ballet, a new company with impressively pedigreed artistic directors. The audition happened on a rainy day, she remembers; her mother encouraged her to go. “She said I’d regret it if I didn’t. I was sewing pointe shoes in the car.” A week later, she got the call..." Harvard Magazine by Maggie Shipstead READ AT SOURCE 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

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  • Los Angeles Ballet's 'Swan Lake' is full of grace | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Ballet's 'Swan Lake' is full of grace March 12, 2012 Highly pedigreed? You bet. Well-known in the dance world? No question. But Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary have also passed the acid test: As directors of the Los Angeles Ballet, now in its sixth season, they can take a collective bow for their thoroughly sterling production of “Swan Lake.” Just remember, not any old company can stage this icon of classical ballet. Oh, many with lesser artistic resources try. But to put on a show of so fine a caliber normally takes a bigger-than-big budget, dancer bench-depth, masterly and dedicated coaching. What’s more, they mounted their full-length extravaganza with the requisite number of performances. “And that meant we had to find venues all over the city.” says Christensen, who led the eminent Royal Danish Ballet and is steeped in its standards of style and rigorous technique. “We had to travel to the audiences,” he adds, noting that people will venture out to an attraction, so long as it doesn’t mean long drives through congested traffic. So from Westwood to Long Beach, with a stop at the Alex Theatre on March 17, the company is showing off its current jewel, “Swan Lake,” all feathery finery, moonlit mirages, pathos born of misfortune, good-versus-evil conflict. Thus the mountain comes to Muhammad. And it is a mountain, what with the full-scale sets originally built at Pacific Northwest Ballet, Christensen’s last post before he decamped to Los Angeles. “In fact,” says the Danish-born danseur, “when you think about it, it’s madness, dealing with four separate acts. We’ve had to extend intermission lengths just to do the set changes,” and that took the crew a week of practice just to learn how to move things along faster, he added. But the décor is eminently beautiful, old-school poetic without looking old — or worn — and it accommodates to any standard proscenium. The costumes, too, are delicate pastels, setting off the pristine-white lakeside scenes. What catches attention, though, apart from these details, is the totality of the spectacle — the dancers’ total immersion in the action and feeling states, be they coryphees, peasants, courtiers, royalty. As to the coaching, well, it is meticulous — in contrast, even, to some A-circuit “Swan Lake” productions, like the last one American Ballet Theatre brought on tour to L.A., where we saw casts that suffered rehearsal deficits. In their prime, both Christensen and Neary danced the lead roles many times. With his deep background in Bournonville, not to mention her prominence as a member of the Balanchine Trust, it’s no surprise that the choreography they adapted from the Petipa/Ivanov model is wonderfully evocative and rational. So, too, is the mime clear, uncluttered and natural — a feat in itself for American dancers seldom exposed to courtly behavior. But then the troupe’s roster now stands higher than ever in its level of virtuosity — thanks mostly to Neary’s recruitment of dancers from companies on which she has set Balanchine works, among them ABT and Russia’s Mariinsky, formerly the Kirov. Still, holding on to them is difficult. “We lose roughly a third each year,” says LAB executive director Julie Whittaker. “But that’s par for the course with all companies.” Corina Gill was stolen by the Boston Ballet, she recalls. And some leave because of the low salaries. “Most of our dancers stay, though. The trick is to keep them performing and not laid off for any substantial period of time.” So far, artistry runs the gamut at Los Angeles Ballet. It also keeps the wheel turning. And this “Swan Lake” does the trick. DONNA PERLMUTTER is an ASCAP-Award winning music/dance critic and journalist whose work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times and many other publications. She is also the author of “Shadowplay: The Life of Antony Tudor.” Email her at donna.perlmutter@gmail.com . Glendale News-Press by Donna Perlmutter DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

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  • Balanchine Casts a Spell | Los Angeles Ballet

    Balanchine Casts a Spell March 13, 2017 Dancers who were new to every role gave the challenging three-part program by Los Angeles Ballet on Saturday the thrills of a high-wire act without a net. Would anyone fall? (Yes, once.) Would anyone succeed brilliantly? (Yes, more than once.) Emergency casting added another edge to the experience at the Alex Theatre in Glendale. An injury to principal dancer Allyssa Bross caused the company to fly in Lia Cirio to take on major roles in two ballets. A principal with Boston Ballet, Cirio not only displayed refined technique but an ability to give herself to the music that took you deeply into the choreography. Since all of the choreography was created by George Balanchine, the stakes were high indeed. It was a shrewd programming ploy to include on the same bill Balanchine’s 1956 “Divertimento No. 15” and his 1970 “Who Cares?” Though radically different in style, these plotless showpieces share structural similarities and, especially, a string of complex, effervescent women’s solos. “Divertimento” is danced to Mozart and seems to belong in an 18th-century royal court; “Who Cares?” is danced to Gershwin and seems to belong on a 20th-century Broadway stage. Cirio appeared perfectly at home in both environments — as did the regal Bianca Bulle and the lyrical Julia Cinquemani. A company premiere, “Divertimento” will need more performances to erase the sense of strain periodically evident on Saturday. But Madison McDonough brought ease and refinement to some exceptionally difficult steps in her variation. What’s more, the staging by company co-director Colleen Neary kept the fabled musicality of the ballet firmly in focus. Although the company has programmed “Who Cares?” before, the new cast and Neary’s staging enforced elegance as well as pizzazz. As the resident dreamboat wooing all the principal women, Tigran Sargsyan was clearly working through some of the intricate partnering issues, but eventually his remarkable generosity as a dancer came into view. He had a tough night: Along with Kenta Shimizu and Dustin True, he also danced strongly in “Divertimento” and “Prodigal Son.” True’s stellar breakthrough came earlier this season in “Stravinsky Violin Concerto,” and on Saturday his cautious diligence occasionally yielded to moments where he again really inhabited the choreography and made it personal. As for Shimizu, he remained faultless as a cavalier in “Divertimento” (no surprise there) but displayed unexpected dramatic powers in the title role of “Prodigal Son.” Impeccably staged by Patricia Neary (Colleen Neary’s sister), this 1929 story ballet set to music by Prokofiev had a cohesion and surety on Saturday that made you relax and fall under its spell. Debut performances? Who could guess, when Shimizu claimed the role at full intensity? There’s a dimension of ironic comedy here that remains to be discovered — and perhaps Shimizu externalized the character’s pain too overtly in the final scene. But his interaction with the impossibly glamorous Elizabeth Claire Walker as the Siren overcame a minefield of technical hazards with no loss to his character’s helpless confusion or her over-the-top hauteur. The seductive, greedy Siren was always as much a living cliché as the stern but forgiving Father (Zheng Hua Li). But Balanchine used these stereotypes to define in the shortest possible time the prodigal’s all-too-human arc from rebellion to contrition. And the dancers exploited their opportunities skillfully. In the 1920s, the Russian ballet world considered Balanchine a radical, and “Prodigal Son” has plenty of evidence: experimental gymnastics, realistic pantomime, bizarre character dancing and plenty of sex. The academic classical vocabulary for which he’s celebrated can be found if you look for it, but a couple years shy of its 90th birthday, the work still looks newly minted — and now one of the great Los Angeles Ballet triumphs. ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Los Angeles Ballet’s ‘Balanchine — Master of the Dance’ When: 7:30 p.m. March 18 at Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center, 1935 Manhattan Beach Blvd., Redondo Beach. Also 2 p.m. March 26 at Royce Hall, UCLA, 340 Royce Drive Tickets: $31-$99 Information: (310) 998-7782, www.losangelesballet.org Follow The Times’ arts team @culturemonster. ALSO Spring preview: What to see in dance, theater, art, classical and more Alvin Ailey translates MLK speeches into dance 'Runway' finalist’s costumes create character for Jessica Lang Dance Movement as bleak theater, with some terrific Pharrell music too Los Angeles Times by Lewis Segal READ AT SOURCE 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • A Wonderfully Refreshing Los Angeles Ballet Performs at The Alex Theatre | Los Angeles Ballet

    A Wonderfully Refreshing Los Angeles Ballet Performs at The Alex Theatre October 10, 2018 Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary’s, wonderfully refreshing Los Angeles Ballet opened their 2018/19 season at the Alex Theatre on Saturday, October 6, with the prolific and brilliant Aszure Barton’s Les Chambres des Jacques . Barton is an eclectic inventive artist and choreographic activist, who in this piece combines Québécois folk rhythms and voice of Gilles Vigneault, and Les Yeux Noire, which were then soothed with the lush beauty of Vivaldi, and the humanity of the Cracow Klezmer Band. The cadences and pulse-like heartbeat, so beautifully executed by the now seasoned dancers of Los Angeles Ballet, was not only splendidly performed but enchanting to experience. The intelligent and courageous leadership of Christensen and Neary, L.A. Ballet’s Artistic Directors, and Julie Whittaker, Executive Director, is insistent that Los Angeles have their own ballet company…and succeed they have, as was revealed on Saturday. Tobin Del Cuore staged Barton’s signature choreography with devotional zeal, making sure, as Barton would, that every part of the body was addressed down to the eyes, face, mouth, and fingers. The breadth of the work was eloquently executed by the dancers Joshua Brown, Laura Chachich, Magnus Christoffersen, Dallas Finley, Madeline Houk, Leah McCall, Costache Mihai, Jasmine Perry; with special mention of Clay Murray’s surprising, wonderfully loose and rhythmic opening that mesmerized the audience with dance which came deeply from inside him. Another highlight was the wonderful pas de quatre, danced by Petra Conti, Tigran Sargsyan, Bianca Bulle, and Kenta Shimizu which delighted us with their unusual playfulness that moved shoulders, hips and bodies rolling together and apart with unanticipated changes. And with that, an amazing, subtle and soulful solo by Sargsyan to the Cracow Klezmer Band which harkened back to the shtetles of Eastern Europe as though it was clear to him the feeling of a heritage long gone. As if this were not dessert enough for us all, we were then treated to Alejandro Cerrudo’s sensual stand out piece, Lickety-split, which examined the dynamics of three couples, their interplay between each other and the group as a whole. Jasmine Perry, so beautifully partnered by Dallas Finley, was exquisite in her seamless interplay, her smooth transitions, and effortless soulful relationship with her partner done to the quiet sometimes raspy tones of Devendra Banhart, Equally langorous, was the smooth movements, as if on ice, drawn by the facile partnership of Tigran Sargsyan, and Bianca Bulle, Joshua Brown and Leah McCall. A kind of Greek chorus on the floor followed the scintillating Dallas Finley’s expressive and impassioned solo. Both the Barton and Cerrudo pieces alone would be a gift of creativity and brilliance, yet the last thank you by the entire company doing Balanchine, the Western Symphony, happily ended our joyous evening. This piece requires strength, endurance, charm, technique and…fun! It appears quaint and classic, yet a gift of another time, when cowboys and dancing girls were an accepted part of the American West in the mind of Mr. B. Restaged by Colleen Neary, who clearly understands the work of George Balanchine, having worked closely with this Master during some of his most prolific years. It is through Neary we get the essence of his work and his legacy. The corps did a fine job of creating superb energy as towns-folk, all the way to the rousing finale. In the first coupling we’re delighted by strong and lyrical Laura Chachich. She shares the stage with the talented, technically marvelous dancer, Eris Nesha, who charmed the audience with his sense of play, his strong presence and engaging charm, which was quite reminiscent of the young Edward Villella. In the second movement, the wonderful Petra Conti, and Tigran Sargsyan, took the lead in their engaging, pas de deux, with Bianca Bulle and Kenta Shimizu’s sparkling and flirtatious third movement. Bianca Bulle leads us through the iconic diagonal in competition with her partner to lead the entire company into the iconic pirouettes from fifth as the curtain goes down on the continuing dance which appears to go on forever. My hope is that it will go on forever with the grand legacy of the growing and thriving Los Angeles Ballet. LA Dance Chronicle by Joanne DiVito VIEW AT SOURCE 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • 2014-2015 Season Expansion | Los Angeles Ballet

    2014-2015 Season Expansion June 1, 2014 LAB’s 9th season includes three full-length romantic story ballets with music by Tchaikovsky and a mixed bill program Los Angeles Ballet Co-Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are excited to unveil LAB’s 2014-2015 season, which includes the Tchaikovsky Trilogy, with three full-length ballets featuring the music of Peter Tchaikovsky, plus a mixed bill program of 20th century masterworks. LAB’s ninth season marks the addition of a fall program for a total of four programs, an expansion from 3 productions in all of its previous seasons. A major goal of Los Angeles Ballet’s long-term plan, LAB is pleased to achieve this in Season 9! The Tchaikovsky Trilogy includes a new production of The Sleeping Beauty , the return of the company’s critically-acclaimed productions of Swan Lake and The Nutcracker all with choreography by Artistic Directors Christensen and Neary, and closes with a mixed bill program that will include works by 20th century choreographic masters. Continuing LAB’s mission to offer world-class professional ballet to greater LA, its programs are performed at LAB’s home theaters: UCLA’s Royce Hall, Glendale’s Alex Theatre, Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge and Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center. In addition, LAB is proud to announce that in December of this year it will present four performances of The Nutcracker at its newest venue - the prestigious Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. LAB opens the season and its first fall program with the full-length Swan Lake (October/November 2014). The company premiered this production during the 2011-2012 season with sold out shows. “After Swan Lake sold out most performances, we had many requests to bring it back. Swan Lake is the perfect way to launch this expanded season and respond to our audience requests.” Mr. Christensen explained. The holidays welcome LAB’s popular The Nutcracker set in 1913 Los Angeles (December 2014). Additional matinees offer more opportunities to see this family favorite and enjoy some of Tchaikovsky’s most beloved music. Spring 2015 opens with the premiere of LAB’s new production of The Sleeping Beauty (February/March) with choreography by Mr. Christensen and Ms. Neary after the original choreography by Marius Petipa. “We have wanted to present The Sleeping Beauty for several years. The Tchaikovsky score is irresistible, but it is a big, classical ballet that requires a lot from all of the dancers, not just the Principals,” Ms. Neary said. “It’s an important measure of how the company has grown that we know LAB is ready to bring this magnificent ballet to life.” The season will close with Directors’ Choice , a mixed bill program that will include Theme and Variations by George Balanchine, (also with music by Tchaikovsky), and two other choreographic luminaries (May/June 2015). The specific repertoire will be announced later in 2014. About Los Angeles Ballet Founded in 2004 by Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, and Executive Director Julie Whittaker, Los Angeles Ballet is known for its superb stagings of the Balanchine repertory, stylistically meticulous classical ballets, and its commitment to new works. LAB has become recognized as a world-class ballet company in eight seasons, presenting 24 productions encompassing 50 works, including 15 commissioned world premieres. Los Angeles Ballet ‘tours’ throughout LA County, regularly appearing at four venues. In 2013, the Los Angeles Music Center presented Los Angeles Ballet at Grand Park, with more than 3,000 attending the outdoor performance. In June 2014, Los Angeles Ballet will tour outside of California for the first time, presenting La Sylphide and Serenade to Seattle, Washington audiences at McCaw Hall at Seattle Center. Since its inception in 2006, LAB’s Power of Performance (POP!) program has provided thousands of free tickets to underserved or disadvantaged children, seniors, veterans, and their families. LAB's A Chance to Dance Community Days outreach program was launched in October 2012. About Thordal Christensen Among Thordal Christensen’s many credentials are an impressive performing career, successful leadership of one of the world's major ballet companies, critically applauded original choreography, and a proven commitment to dance education. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Christensen received his ballet training at The Royal Danish Ballet School and at the School of American Ballet in New York City before a performance career that included the Royal Danish Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Christensen then returned to Denmark where he was Artistic Director of the Royal Danish Ballet. This blend of Bournonville and Balanchine tradition is one of the defining themes of his career, and has shaped the unique artistic vision that Christensen, along with his wife Colleen Neary, bring to Los Angeles Ballet. In 2002, he was made Knight of the Dannebrog by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. About Colleen Neary Colleen Neary brings to Los Angeles Ballet the benefits of her vast experience as one of George Balanchine's quintessential ballerinas. In her experience as a dancer, teacher, and ballet mistress, she also worked closely with other luminaries of 20th century dance, including Rudolf Nureyev, Maurice Béjart, and Jiří Kylián. Born in Miami, Florida and trained at The School of American Ballet, Neary danced in New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine, then for Maurice Béjart's Ballet du XXième Siecle , and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Neary was personally selected by Balanchine to teach his choreography to major companies all over the world as a repetiteur for The George Balanchine Trust. ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Times Includes LAB in it’s Best of 2007 Listings | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Times Includes LAB in it’s Best of 2007 Listings December 1, 2007 The corps, including the children, danced strongly. Melissa Barak, the First Sylph, gave notice of incipient major Sylph duties. The ballet, staged by co-artistic director Thordal Christensen, a former principal with the Royal Danish Ballet, was danced to pre-recorded music. Los Angeles Times ​ DOWNLOAD PDF 2021/2022 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

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