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  • Adult Summer Intensive | Los Angeles Ballet

    ADULT SUMMER INTENSIVE 2023/2024 Season > Adult Summer Intensive Join LAB this summer for an immersive ballet experience! If you’ve always dreamed of taking the stage with a premier ballet company, step up to the barre and into the dance shoes of life as a member of Los Angeles Ballet. From plié to pas de deux, you will learn from ballet’s best and brightest in this weeklong summer intensive program. Train with company dancers and conditioning staff Attend a series of enlightening seminars that will teach you the tricks of the trade Learn excerpts of Melissa Barak’s Memoryhouse, which will be performed in our upcoming 24/25 season Program Details When July 22-July 26, 2024, from 5 pm - 8:30 pm daily Where Los Angeles Ballet Center, 11755 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90064 Ticket Costs Partial Program Participation: $475 Includes technique, seminars, and repertoire Full Program Participation: $600 Includes technique, seminars, repertoire, pointe, and specialty men’s classes For ages 18 and above Must have beginner - intermediate dance experience. Professional experience is not required Class size is limited. Secure your spot today! You are limited to one (1) signup maximum per transaction. Purchase is non-refundable. SIGN UP SIGN UP Memoryhouse , Photo by Cheryl Mann Photography REGISTER TODAY Program Schedule Monday: Partial Program Technique, LAB Repertoire Full Program Technique, Pointe and Specialty Men, LAB Repertoire ​ Tuesday: Partial Program Technique, Dancer’s Guide to Injury Prevention Seminar, LAB Repertoire Full Program Technique, Dancer’s Guide to Injury Prevention Seminar, LAB Repertoire ​ Wednesday: Partial Program Technique, LAB Repertoire Partial Program Technique, Pointe, Specialty Men, LAB Repertoire Thursday: Partial Program Technique, Dancer’s Guide to Conditioning and Strengthening Seminar, LAB Repertoire Full Program Technique, Dancer’s Guide to Conditioning and Strengthening Seminar, LAB Repertoire Friday: Partial Program Technique, LAB Repertoire Full Program Technique, Pointe, Specialty Men, LAB Repertoire This is the ultimate opportunity to step out of the audience and onto the stage. Join LAB for this unique dance experience! Sign up today. Memoryhouse , Photo by Cheryl Mann Photography Additional questions, contact LAB Rehearsal Director, Laura Chachich Lchachich@losangelesballet.org SIGN UP PARTICIPATE Become a Member Today! LAB’s Membership Circles are donor benefits designed to build a community through a shared love of ballet and to provide a deeper appreciation of the art form through unique experiences and exclusive content. BECOME A MEMBER WELCOME A Chance to Dance (ACTD) ACTD is presented two Sundays each month during Los Angeles Ballet’s season at LAB Center. LAB dancers teach free ballet classes, alternative dance/fitness classes, and more! All ages are welcome. VIEW ACTD SCHEDULE

  • 2013-2014 Season Announcement | Los Angeles Ballet

    2013-2014 Season Announcement October 1, 2013 The Nutcracker set in 1913 Los Angeles World premieres from Sonya Tayeh and Christopher Stowell • LAB premiere of Jiří Kylián’s Return to a Strange Land LAB premiere of George Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes The full-length La Sylphide George Balanchine’s Serenade Los Angeles Ballet co-artistic directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are excited to unveil the ballets selected for LAB’s eighth season, including classics from the 19th and 20th centuries, new works from 21st century choreographers, and Southern California’s holiday tradition, The Nutcracker . Continuing LAB’s mission to bring professional ballet to greater LA, each program will be performed at LAB’s four home theaters: UCLA’s Royce Hall, The Alex Theatre in Glendale, Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center, and Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge. The season opens with Los Angeles Ballet’s full-length The Nutcracker , set in 1913 California in a classic Spanish style home with Mexican, Spanish, and European influences. The story unfolds with a warm and inviting sense of being inside a children’s book, and follows Clara and her beloved Nutcracker as they travel to the Land of Snow and the Palace of the Dolls. In March 2014, Quartet combines masterworks from George Balanchine and Jiří Kylián with new works from rising choreographers Sonya Tayeh and Christopher Stowell. Known for her work on television’s So You Think You Can Dance , this will mark Tayeh’s fourth commissioned work for Los Angeles Ballet. Her ferocious jazz style blended with ballet has brought audiences and critics to their feet. Former Artistic Director of Oregon Ballet Theater and noted choreographer Christopher Stowell will be working with LAB dancers for the first time. Quartet will also include the company premiere of Return to a Strange Land , from master choreographer Jiří Kylián to music by Leoš Janáček, and Stars and Stripes by George Balanchine set to the rousing marches of John Philip Sousa. “The dancers always look forward to working with Sonya. And having seen Christopher’s work on a variety of companies across the nation, we are excited to see what he will be creating on our dancers,” Mr. Christensen explained. “We think works from these two young dancemakers will fit well with Jiří Kylián’s beautiful, elegiac ballet and Balanchine’s stirring valentine to his adopted country.” May/June 2014 pairs the rapturous two-act story ballet La Sylphide with Balanchine’s romantic Serenade. Some- times described as the Danish Giselle , La Sylphide recounts the tale of a Scotsman enamored of an entrancing woodland sprite, a sylph, and the poisonous interference of a witch, with tragic results. The program also includes Serenade , unquestionably one of Balanchine’s most popular and beloved ballets. Set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for String s, the ballet evokes a moonlit world of romantic attraction and betrayal. Colleen Neary says, “La Sylphide and Serenade are two of the most romantic and, some say, most tragic ballets choreographed – the former with a story and the other without a literal one. There is a deep spiritualism to both.” About Los Angeles Ballet Founded in 2004 by Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, and Executive Director Julie Whittaker, Los Angeles Ballet is known for its superb stagings of the Balanchine repertory, stylistically meticu- lous classical ballets, and its commitment to new works. LAB has become recognized as a world-class ballet company, presenting 21 productions encompassing 43 works, including 13 commissioned world premieres. Los Angeles Ballet ‘tours’ throughout LA County, regularly appearing at five venues. This past summer the Los Angeles Music Center presented Los Angeles Ballet at Grand Park, with 4,000 attending the outdoor performance on the July 4th weekend. Since its inception in 2006, LAB’s Power of Performance (POP!) program has provided thousands of free tickets to underserved or disadvantaged children, seniors, veterans, and their families. LAB’s A Chance to Dance Community Days outreach program was launched in October 2012. About Thordal Christensen Among Thordal Christensen’s many credentials are an impressive performing career, successful leadership of one of the world’s major ballet companies, critically applaudedoriginal choreography, and a proven commit- ment to dance education. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Christensen received his ballet training at The Royal Danish Ballet School and at the School of American Ballet in New York City before a performance career that included the Royal Danish Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Christensen then returned to Denmark where he was Artistic Director of the Royal Danish Ballet. This blend of Bournonville and Balanchine tradition is one of the defining themes of his career, and has shaped the unique artistic vision that Christensen, along with his wife Colleen Neary, bring to Los Angeles Ballet. In 2002, he was made Knight of the Dannebrog by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. About Colleen Neary Colleen Neary brings to Los Angeles Ballet the benefits of her vast experience as one of George Balanchine’s quintessential ballerinas. In her experience as a dancer, teacher, and ballet mistress, she also worked closely with other luminaries of 20th century dance, including Rudolf Nureyev, Maurice Béjart and Jiří Kylián. Born in Miami, Florida and trained at The School of American Ballet, Neary danced in New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine, then for Maurice Béjart’s Ballet du XXième Siecle, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Neary was personally selected by Balanchine to teach his choreography to major companies all over the world as a repetiteur for The George Balanchine Trust. ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Times Covers LAB Gala 2018 | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Times Covers LAB Gala 2018 February 1, 2018 At the Los Angeles Ballet’s annual gala, the classical dance company honored three multi-talented, multi-hyphenates — Jenna Dewan Tatum, Derek Hough and Adam Shankman — all of them dancers among other accomplishments and passionate on the subject of dance. “Dance is my everything,” Dewan said during the cocktail hour. “All roads lead back to dance for me,” added the actress, dancer and host of “World of Dance.” “No matter what I do in my career, no matter what I do in my life, being a dancer informs me. It’s who I am.” A judge on “World of Dance,” Hough, an actor-dancer-author-choreographer, said he took his first official lesson at age 10, “but if I look at old home videos of myself and my family, and I can see we were dancing in our living room since we were born.” Hough holds a record on “Dancing With the Stars,” having won six mirror balls. Shankman said later from the podium, “As the story goes, I actually emerged from my mother doing cartwheels with a top hat and cane. … I dance to live and I live to dance, and God willing, I’ll die doing a cartwheel, still clutching my cane.” (The producer-director-choreographer’s current project is the “Enchanted” sequel, “Disenchanted.”) The Los Angeles Ballet celebrated “Swan Lake” on Feb. 24 with a black and white themed-gala at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Beverly Hills. More than $1 million was raised for its programming and educational outreach. Artistic directors Colleen Neary and Thordal Christensen introduced the dancers, who performed excerpts from “Swan Lake.” The interpretation of Spanish, Neapolitan, Hungarian and Russian folk dances and elegant black swan pas de deux were then followed by a young troupe from “A Chance to Dance,” Los Angeles Ballet’s program of free classes. Disney star Sofia Carson said earlier in the evening that she had recently taught one of these classes, which are offered to children ages 2 and older. Attending the gala with her sister Paulina, Carson said, “I was 3 when I took my first dance lesson, and it changed my life forever.” (She also said that her film “Descendants 3” would shoot in Vancouver this summer.) Mark L. Walberg, host of “Antiques Roadshow,” emceed the affair, with presenters Nigel Lythgoe, Brad Goreski and Mark Ballas; guests Camilla Belle, Emmanuelle Chriqui, Kimberly and James Van Der Beek, and others. Kirsten Sarkisian and Leslie Kavanaugh were co-chairs of the event, along with honorary committee chairs Sharon and Gray Davis, Marilyn and Robert Day, Ghada and Ray Irani, Lori and Michael Milken, Linda La Kretz-Duttenhaver and Richard Merkin. Tickets for the 325-plus guests began at $500, and tables ranged to $100,000. Proceeds also included a silent auction and additional donations. After suggesting that the crowd raise a glass to Los Angeles Ballet, “our beloved home team,” which he’d earlier described as “my Dodgers,” Shankman spoke, not only of his love of dance but also of the importance of supporting the arts. “If we are to leave any legacy of value to the next generations,” he said, “then it is our responsibility to support in every way imaginable institutions like the Los Angeles Ballet, and to do everything in our power both to bring people to us, and also to go into the communities, and to help this generation know that there is more to life than darkness and division and the arduous fight for justice, or even simply to be seen to feel safe.” LA Times by Ellen Olivier READ ARTICLE AT SOURCE 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • The new company's diverse dancers form a robust whole in a program of Balanchine and Bournonville. | Los Angeles Ballet

    The new company's diverse dancers form a robust whole in a program of Balanchine and Bournonville. March 17, 2007 Los Angeles Ballet's diverse program forms a robust whole. It's hard enough for dancers trained in different styles of ballet — sometimes in different countries — to form a unified ensemble. It's harder still to display that unity in the distinctive dance languages of two choreographic masters. Born just four months ago, Los Angeles Ballet passed that test in its first repertory program Thursday at UCLA's Freud Playhouse — maybe not perfectly, maybe not without a pervasive sense of effort, but splendidly enough to make three challenging pieces come alive for a large, enthusiastic audience. Classical Balanchine, contemporary Balanchine and buoyant, Romantic Bournonville all received scrupulous performances in stagings by company artistic directors Colleen Neary (a Balanchine specialist) and Thordal Christensen (an alumnus of Bournonville's Royal Danish Ballet). Whether or not it can survive in our traditionally inhospitable dance landscape, their Los Angeles Ballet is the real thing, a force for many kinds of excellence that deserves the community's attention and support. One could wish that as the company moves from Westwood to Redondo Beach and then to Glendale this month, the dancers might relax into their roles and enjoy their dancing as much as the audience does. It's not a matter of smiles (of which there were plenty Thursday) but of the sense of interpretive freedom within the choreography that only Melissa Barak and a very few others showed opening night. Barak's individual and often spontaneous attacks came in Balanchine's "Concerto Barocco," which always seems to be a showcase for conservative classical purity until you look more closely and see the innovative body-foldings, partnering experiments and other creative wonders that Balanchine devised in 1941 to music by Bach. Mirroring Barak in the outer sections and becoming the work's focus in the central duet, Corina Gill gave a rapt, secure performance, partnered with great nobility by Oleg Gorboulev. Gill and Gorboulev also brought their remarkable ability to deliver a string of choreographic fireworks as one brilliantly sustained phrase to Balanchine's "Agon," an inspired 1957 game of neoclassic one-upmanship played with and against Igor Stravinsky. All fire and ice, whimsical forays into off-balance balance and a modernistic milestone, the choreography can look a lot jauntier than it did Thursday, but Neary's deadpan staging did allow all the non sequiturs to take you by surprise. As with "Concerto Barocco," the company as a whole often managed the complex passages more artfully than the simplest steps, but Lauren Toole endowed both with a serene confidence in her technical control. Sergey Kheylik threw himself into his solo with complete abandon, but neatness definitely counted here, and his wild vivacity proved far more useful in the divertissements from Bournonville's "Napoli." With music by Helsted and Paulli, the celebratory "Napoli" pas de six and tarantella date from 1842, before classical bravura acquired the edge of aggression it gained, for better or worse, in Russia. If "Agon" is consummately spiky and "Concerto Barocco" supremely flowing, this quasi-Italianate showpiece is indomitably fluffy, marked by major shifts in tempo and pressure (to which the company needs greater attention) but always light and genial. On Thursday, exposed balances in extension sometimes proved shaky and terminations not always ideally clean. But it was fascinating to see what elements of Bournonville style attracted the individual soloists and dominated their performances. Guest Rainer Krenstetter of the Berlin Staatsballett had the sparkle, Masahiro Suehara the precision, Gill the sweetness and Toole the calm center. Kheylik, as always, brought invigorating energy to the party. The excerpt also displayed the talents of Peter Snow, Kelly Ann Sloan, Alexandra Blacker, Nancy Richer and Erin RiveraBrennand. Everyone looked yummy in Soren Frandsen's prismatic abstractions of folk costumes and behaved as if an L.A. company dancing a Danish interpretation of Italian folklore was, somehow, natural casting. Taped music accompanied all the pieces on the program. lewis.segal@latimes.com Los Angeles Times by Lewis Segal DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Ballet delivers a sizzling 'Evangelist' | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Ballet delivers a sizzling 'Evangelist' April 28, 2008 Corina Gill was the poised, ethereal Sylph, balancing lightly and cleanly in high extensions. Her most arresting moments, however, came in her death scene, where she seemed to lose the power of sight as well as of flight. Los Angeles Times by Victoria Looseleaf DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Ballet: L.A. Ballet soloists show sense of purpose, if not peak skills, in season debut | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Ballet: L.A. Ballet soloists show sense of purpose, if not peak skills, in season debut February 25, 2008 The other plum role, of course, is the evil Madge. She is first discovered cowering by James’ fire but is last seen towering triumphantly above his body. Why did she wreck such evil, so out of proportion to the original offense? Her answer is a drumming of her fingers on her chest. “I,” “I,” “I,” she gestures, because James offended her. Los Angeles Times by Lewis Segal DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • L.A.'s ballet: A hard nut to crack but ballet duo is determined to do it | Los Angeles Ballet

    L.A.'s ballet: A hard nut to crack but ballet duo is determined to do it November 17, 2006 Los Angeles has been a hard nut to crack, but ballet duo Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are determined to do it. The husband and wife team are staking their reputation and their supporter's money on a new Los Angeles Ballet that will be unveiled in December – their Christmas present to the sprawling county's dance lovers. View PDF to read the full article. Pasadena Star-News by Vicki Smith Paluch DOWNLOAD ARTICLE (PDF) 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • The Nutcracker 2017

    2 2023/2024 Season > Photo Gallery > 2017/2018 The Nutcracker 2017 Mackenzie Moser LAB Ensemble Petra Conti LAB Ensemble Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Jasmine Perry & Joshua Brown LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Bianca Bulle & LAB Ensemble Petra Conti & Tigran Sargsyan Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble Mackenzie Moser LAB Ensemble Petra Conti LAB Ensemble Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Jasmine Perry & Joshua Brown LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Bianca Bulle & LAB Ensemble Petra Conti & Tigran Sargsyan Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble Mackenzie Moser LAB Ensemble Petra Conti LAB Ensemble Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Jasmine Perry & Joshua Brown LAB Ensemble LAB Ensemble Bianca Bulle & LAB Ensemble Petra Conti & Tigran Sargsyan Mackenzie Moser & LAB Ensemble Prodigal Son – Balanchine / Prokofiev Previous Gallery Next Gallery All photos by Reed Hutchinson Click on image for a fullscreen presentation.

  • Season 2009-2010

    2 2023/2024 Season > Photo Gallery > Season 2009-2010 George Balanchine Lucy Van Cleef in George Balachine's 'Serenade'; Photo: Reed Hutchinson George Balachine's 'Serenade'; Photo: Reed Hutchinson Andrew Brader in George Balachine's 'Serenade' Monica Pelfrey & Melissa Barak in George Balanchine's 'Serenade' Monica Pelfrey & Zheng Hua Li in George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' Grace McLoughlin & Zheng Hua Lo, and Endsemble in George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' Grace McLoughlin, Melissa Barak, and Ensemble in George Balnchine's 'Kammermusik Piano Concerto No. 2' George Balnchine Drew Grant & Grace McLoughlin in George Balnchine's 'Kammermusik Piano Concerto No. 2' Chelsea Paige Johnston & Chehon Wespi-Tschopp in 'Wink' by Mandy Moore Mandy Moore Chelsea Paige Johnston & Chehon Wespi-Tschopp in 'Wink' by Mandy Moore Monica Pelfrey & Zheng Hua Li in "Reflect. Affect. Carry on...' by Travis Wall Alexander Forck, Chelsea Paige Johnston & Craig Hall in "Reflect. Affect. Carry on...' by Travis Wall Josie Walsh Josie Walsh Andrew Brader in 'Transmutation' by Josie Walsh Josie Walsh Grace McLoughlin in 'The Back and Forth' by Sonya Tayeh Kate Highstrete & Andrew Brader in 'The Back and Forth' by Sonya Tayeh Christensen/Neary Helena Thordal-Christensen in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Harrison Coll and Helena Thordal-Christensen in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Previous Gallery Next Gallery All photos by Reed Hutchinson Click on image for a fullscreen presentation.

  • First Seattle Tour | Los Angeles Ballet

    First Seattle Tour May 1, 2014 La Sylphide plus George Balanchine’s Serenade June 27, 2014 McCaw Hall, Seattle Center Performances to include: The full-length romantic story ballet La Sylphide, choreographed by Thordal Christensen after August Bournonville George Balanchine’s SerenadeLos Angeles Ballet Co-Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are excited to announce that the company will be touring out of California for the first time, presenting La Sylphide and Serenade to Seattle, Washington audiences June 27, 2014, at McCaw Hall at Seattle Center. This will immediately follow LAB’s tour of the same production throughout Los Angeles County.Christensen and Neary are thrilled to be bringing their first touring production to Seattle, as it is where their partnership was created – both onstage and off. Christensen and Neary were Principal Dancers for Pacific Northwest Ballet (PNB) from 1986 through 1992, dancing in ballets by Kent Stowell, Clark Tippett, Glen Tetley, George Balanchine, Lynn Taylor Corbett, José Limón, and Lar Lubovitch, as well as classics like Swan Lake. Christensen and Neary married in 1987, with PNB Founding Artistic Directors Kent Stowell and Francia Russell as their witnesses. Stowell and Russell provided Christensen and Neary with critical inspiration to eventually launch Los Angeles Ballet. “We danced at PNB in an enormous growth period for that company, during a creative time when it began to tour to Hawaii, the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and other major cities,” says Neary. It was this creative spark and strong partnership between Christensen and Neary that led to the formation of Los Angeles Ballet, and their connection to PNB that makes Seattle the ideal choice for LAB’s first out-of-state tour. LAB’s La Sylphide was debuted in 2009 with choreography by Christensen after the original 19th century ballet by Danish choreographer August Bournonville. “Los Angeles Ballet’s performances in 2009 were exemplary, among the finest achievements in the company’s history,” said Lewis Segal in his recent LA Times article, ‘Faces to Watch 2014.’ At McCaw Hall at Seattle Center, the two-act story ballet La Sylphide will be paired with George Balanchine’s romantic Serenade. La Sylphide, sometimes described as the Danish Giselle, recounts the tale of a Scotsman enamored of an entrancing woodland sprite (a sylph) and the poisonous interference of a witch, with tragic results. Serenade is unquestionably one of Balanchine’s most popular and beloved ballets. Set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings, the ballet evokes a moonlit world of romantic attraction and betrayal. Colleen Neary says, “La Sylphide and Serenade are two of the most romantic and, some say, most tragic ballets choreographed – the former with a story and the other without a literal one. There is a deep spiritualism to both.” About Los Angeles Ballet Founded in 2004 by Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, and Executive Director Julie Whittaker, Los Angeles Ballet is known for its superb stagings of the Balanchine repertory, stylistically meticulous classical ballets, and its commitment to new works. LAB has become recognized as a world-class ballet company, in eight seasons presenting 24 productions encompassing 50 works, including 15 commissioned world premieres. Los Angeles Ballet ‘tours’ throughout LA County, regularly appearing at four venues. This past summer the Los Angeles Music Center presented Los Angeles Ballet at Grand Park, with more than 3,000 attending the outdoor performance. Since its inception in 2006, LAB’s Power of Performance (POP!) program has provided thousands of free tickets to underserved or disadvantaged children, seniors, veterans, and their families. LAB's A Chance to Dance Community Days outreach program was launched in October 2012. About Thordal Christensen Among Thordal Christensen’s many credentials are an impressive performing career, successful leadership of one of the world's major ballet companies, critically applauded original choreography, and a proven commitment to dance education. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Christensen received his ballet training at The Royal Danish Ballet School and at the School of American Ballet in New York City before a performance career that included the Royal Danish Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Christensen then returned to Denmark where he was Artistic Director of the Royal Danish Ballet This blend of Bournonville and Balanchine tradition is one of the defining themes of his career, and has shaped the unique artistic vision that Christensen, along with his wife Colleen Neary, bring to Los Angeles Ballet. In 2002, he was made Knight of the Dannebrog by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. About Colleen Neary Colleen Neary brings to Los Angeles Ballet the benefits of her vast experience as one of George Balanchine's quintessential ballerinas. In her experience as a dancer, teacher, and ballet mistress, she also worked closely with other luminaries of 20th century dance, including Rudolf Nureyev, Maurice Béjart, and Jiří Kylián. Born in Miami, Florida and trained at The School of American Ballet, Neary danced in New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine, then for Maurice Béjart's Ballet du XXième Siecle, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Neary was personally selected by Balanchine to teach his choreography to major companies all over the world as a repetiteur for The George Balanchine Trust. ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Ballet teams with LA Magazine, Wachovia Bank, LA’s Best & Warner Brothers Studios for a Holiday Extravaganza | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Ballet teams with LA Magazine, Wachovia Bank, LA’s Best & Warner Brothers Studios for a Holiday Extravaganza December 1, 2007 In other roles, Grace McLoughlin danced Effie with sweet innocence. James Li was Gurn, James’ best friend, a naïf who winds up marrying Effie after James’ disappearance. (Peter Snow will take over the role in two of the three remaining performances.) Andrew Brader and Drew Grant were the friends. Company News from the Staff at LAB 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

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