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  • Season 2009-2010

    2 2023/2024 Season > Photo Gallery > Season 2009-2010 George Balanchine Lucy Van Cleef in George Balachine's 'Serenade'; Photo: Reed Hutchinson George Balachine's 'Serenade'; Photo: Reed Hutchinson Andrew Brader in George Balachine's 'Serenade' Monica Pelfrey & Melissa Barak in George Balanchine's 'Serenade' Monica Pelfrey & Zheng Hua Li in George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' Grace McLoughlin & Zheng Hua Lo, and Endsemble in George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' George Balnchine's 'Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 2' Grace McLoughlin, Melissa Barak, and Ensemble in George Balnchine's 'Kammermusik Piano Concerto No. 2' George Balnchine Drew Grant & Grace McLoughlin in George Balnchine's 'Kammermusik Piano Concerto No. 2' Chelsea Paige Johnston & Chehon Wespi-Tschopp in 'Wink' by Mandy Moore Mandy Moore Chelsea Paige Johnston & Chehon Wespi-Tschopp in 'Wink' by Mandy Moore Monica Pelfrey & Zheng Hua Li in "Reflect. Affect. Carry on...' by Travis Wall Alexander Forck, Chelsea Paige Johnston & Craig Hall in "Reflect. Affect. Carry on...' by Travis Wall Josie Walsh Josie Walsh Andrew Brader in 'Transmutation' by Josie Walsh Josie Walsh Grace McLoughlin in 'The Back and Forth' by Sonya Tayeh Kate Highstrete & Andrew Brader in 'The Back and Forth' by Sonya Tayeh Christensen/Neary Helena Thordal-Christensen in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Harrison Coll and Helena Thordal-Christensen in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Previous Gallery Next Gallery All photos by Reed Hutchinson Click on image for a fullscreen presentation.

  • Season 2012-2013

    2 2023/2024 Season > Photo Gallery > Season 2012-2013 Christensen/Neary Mia Katz & Nicolas de la Vega in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Bianca Bulle in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Zheng Hua Li in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Snowflakes Ensemble in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Helena Thordal-Christensen, David Block & Nicholas de la Vega in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Julia Cinquemani & Alexander Castillo in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Allynne Noelle & Ulrik Birkkjaer in 'The Nutcracker' by Christensen/Neary Allynne Noelle & Zheng Hua Li and Ensemble in George Balanchine's 'La Sonnambula' Allynne Noelle & Zheng Hua Li in George Balanchine's 'La Sonnambula' Chelsea Paige Johnstin & Zheng Hua Li in George Balanchine's 'La Sonnambula' Chelsea Paige Johnstin & Zheng Hua Li in George Balanchine's 'La Sonnambula' Julia Cinquemani & Alyssa Bross and Ensemble in George Balanchine's 'Concerto Barocco' Julia Cinquemani & Alexander Castillo and Ensemble in George Balanchine's 'Concerto Barocco' Allynne Noelle & Kenta Shimizu in George Balanchine's 'Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux' Allyssa Bross & Ulrik Birkkjaer in George Balanchine's 'Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux' Ulrik Birkkjaer in George Balanchine's 'Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux' Kenta Shimizu & Ensemble in George Balanchine's 'The Four Temperaments' Allyssa Bross & Christopher Revels in George Balanchine's 'The Four Temperaments' Kenta Shimizu & Ensemble in George Balanchine's 'The Four Temperaments' Kate Highstrete & Christopher Revels in George Balanchine's 'The Four Temperaments' Chelsea Paige Johnston & Alexander Castillo and Ensemble in 'La Valse' Allyssa Bross & Zheng Hua Li in 'La Valse' Allyssa Bross & Zheng Hua Li in 'La Valse' Allyssa Bross & Zheng Hua Li in 'La Valse' Previous Gallery Next Gallery All photos by Reed Hutchinson Click on image for a fullscreen presentation.

  • Los Angeles Times Includes LAB in it’s Best of 2007 Listings | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Times Includes LAB in it’s Best of 2007 Listings December 1, 2007 The corps, including the children, danced strongly. Melissa Barak, the First Sylph, gave notice of incipient major Sylph duties. The ballet, staged by co-artistic director Thordal Christensen, a former principal with the Royal Danish Ballet, was danced to pre-recorded music. Los Angeles Times ​ READ ARTICLE AT SOURCE 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • 2014-2015 Season Expansion | Los Angeles Ballet

    2014-2015 Season Expansion June 1, 2014 LAB’s 9th season includes three full-length romantic story ballets with music by Tchaikovsky and a mixed bill program Los Angeles Ballet Co-Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are excited to unveil LAB’s 2014-2015 season, which includes the Tchaikovsky Trilogy, with three full-length ballets featuring the music of Peter Tchaikovsky, plus a mixed bill program of 20th century masterworks. LAB’s ninth season marks the addition of a fall program for a total of four programs, an expansion from 3 productions in all of its previous seasons. A major goal of Los Angeles Ballet’s long-term plan, LAB is pleased to achieve this in Season 9! The Tchaikovsky Trilogy includes a new production of The Sleeping Beauty , the return of the company’s critically-acclaimed productions of Swan Lake and The Nutcracker all with choreography by Artistic Directors Christensen and Neary, and closes with a mixed bill program that will include works by 20th century choreographic masters. Continuing LAB’s mission to offer world-class professional ballet to greater LA, its programs are performed at LAB’s home theaters: UCLA’s Royce Hall, Glendale’s Alex Theatre, Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge and Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center. In addition, LAB is proud to announce that in December of this year it will present four performances of The Nutcracker at its newest venue - the prestigious Dolby Theatre in Hollywood. LAB opens the season and its first fall program with the full-length Swan Lake (October/November 2014). The company premiered this production during the 2011-2012 season with sold out shows. “After Swan Lake sold out most performances, we had many requests to bring it back. Swan Lake is the perfect way to launch this expanded season and respond to our audience requests.” Mr. Christensen explained. The holidays welcome LAB’s popular The Nutcracker set in 1913 Los Angeles (December 2014). Additional matinees offer more opportunities to see this family favorite and enjoy some of Tchaikovsky’s most beloved music. Spring 2015 opens with the premiere of LAB’s new production of The Sleeping Beauty (February/March) with choreography by Mr. Christensen and Ms. Neary after the original choreography by Marius Petipa. “We have wanted to present The Sleeping Beauty for several years. The Tchaikovsky score is irresistible, but it is a big, classical ballet that requires a lot from all of the dancers, not just the Principals,” Ms. Neary said. “It’s an important measure of how the company has grown that we know LAB is ready to bring this magnificent ballet to life.” The season will close with Directors’ Choice , a mixed bill program that will include Theme and Variations by George Balanchine, (also with music by Tchaikovsky), and two other choreographic luminaries (May/June 2015). The specific repertoire will be announced later in 2014. About Los Angeles Ballet Founded in 2004 by Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary, and Executive Director Julie Whittaker, Los Angeles Ballet is known for its superb stagings of the Balanchine repertory, stylistically meticulous classical ballets, and its commitment to new works. LAB has become recognized as a world-class ballet company in eight seasons, presenting 24 productions encompassing 50 works, including 15 commissioned world premieres. Los Angeles Ballet ‘tours’ throughout LA County, regularly appearing at four venues. In 2013, the Los Angeles Music Center presented Los Angeles Ballet at Grand Park, with more than 3,000 attending the outdoor performance. In June 2014, Los Angeles Ballet will tour outside of California for the first time, presenting La Sylphide and Serenade to Seattle, Washington audiences at McCaw Hall at Seattle Center. Since its inception in 2006, LAB’s Power of Performance (POP!) program has provided thousands of free tickets to underserved or disadvantaged children, seniors, veterans, and their families. LAB's A Chance to Dance Community Days outreach program was launched in October 2012. About Thordal Christensen Among Thordal Christensen’s many credentials are an impressive performing career, successful leadership of one of the world's major ballet companies, critically applauded original choreography, and a proven commitment to dance education. Born in Copenhagen, Denmark, Christensen received his ballet training at The Royal Danish Ballet School and at the School of American Ballet in New York City before a performance career that included the Royal Danish Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Christensen then returned to Denmark where he was Artistic Director of the Royal Danish Ballet. This blend of Bournonville and Balanchine tradition is one of the defining themes of his career, and has shaped the unique artistic vision that Christensen, along with his wife Colleen Neary, bring to Los Angeles Ballet. In 2002, he was made Knight of the Dannebrog by Queen Margrethe II of Denmark. About Colleen Neary Colleen Neary brings to Los Angeles Ballet the benefits of her vast experience as one of George Balanchine's quintessential ballerinas. In her experience as a dancer, teacher, and ballet mistress, she also worked closely with other luminaries of 20th century dance, including Rudolf Nureyev, Maurice Béjart, and Jiří Kylián. Born in Miami, Florida and trained at The School of American Ballet, Neary danced in New York City Ballet under the direction of George Balanchine, then for Maurice Béjart's Ballet du XXième Siecle , and Pacific Northwest Ballet. Neary was personally selected by Balanchine to teach his choreography to major companies all over the world as a repetiteur for The George Balanchine Trust. ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Visions of Nutcrackers | Los Angeles Ballet

    Visions of Nutcrackers November 23, 2006 Los Angeles Daily News by Vicki Smith Paluch READ ARTICLE AT SOURCE 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • 2021-2022 Photo Gallery | The Los Angeles Ballet

    2021/2022 Photo Gallery The Nutcracker Bloom 2023/2024 Season > Photo Gallery > 2021/2022

  • Four World Premiers in NextWave LA | Los Angeles Ballet

    Four World Premiers in NextWave LA March 8, 2010 Guest Choreographers from the Hit Show "So You Think You Can Dance" (Los Angeles, March 8, 2010 ) Los Angeles Ballet [LAB] Artistic Directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary are thrilled to present New Wave LA which involves four contemporary World Premieres from guest choreographers Josie Walsh, and Sonya Tayeh, Mandy Moore and Travis Wall from the hit FOX show “So You Think You Can Dance.” Each choreographer will present an innovative, modern, edgy and world class piece with Los Angeles Ballet dancers. New Wave LA is a ground-breaking program for LAB, commissioning four acclaimed choreographers to create on LAB dancers. This program follows Los Angeles Ballet’s mission of incorporating new creations specifically for LAB dancers throughout its season. The four choreographers Josie Walsh, Sonya Tayeh, Mandy Moore and Travis Wall are all elated to be pre- senting FOUR world premieres in ONE evening which is rarely done in a ballet company. Los Angeles Ballet is also proud to present Transmutation, by LA’s own Josie Walsh, developed from a piece originally commis- sioned by the First Annual LAB Choreographic Workshop. Sonya Tayeh, Mandy Moore and Travis Wall’s World Premiere pieces are still untitled. Josie Walsh is a native of Los Angeles and a former professional dancer with the Joffrey Ballet, Zurich Ballet and Oregon Ballet Theatre. Upon her return to Los Angeles, Walsh integrated her vast background into the commercial world. Walsh founded MYOKYO Renegade Rock Ballets in 2000. She is the director, producer and choreographer for the company, creating an eclectic style of inter-disciplinary cooperation. Sonya Tayeh incorporates her deeply rooted form with the essence of contemporary technique, mixing her own ‘quirky’ style into her choreography. This stylized, free-flowing movement is aggressively formulated through one-on-one physical contact. She is currently a choreographer for “So You Think You Can Dance.” Mandy Moore is an exciting, emerging choreographer and performer whose work has been seen on films and television shows such as “So You Think You Can Dance.” She was one of the choreographers for Celine Dion’s “Taking Chances” World Tour. Travis Wall is a choreographer who choreographed for “So You Think You Can Dance” and was principal dancer for Wade Robson on ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars.” These four outstanding choreographers will exercise their unique style and personality in the World Premieres of New Wave LA. The much-anticipated repertoire will take place at venues across Los Angeles from May 15 to May 30 (please see full performance schedule below). ​ LAB Public Relations DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Los Angeles Ballet: A spring in its step | Los Angeles Ballet

    Los Angeles Ballet: A spring in its step February 24, 2008 To state the obvious, Los Angeles Ballet's identity will be forged through its repertory and how its dancers perform. But the fledgling company's true branding will take form from the dances it commissions: the ballets it has that no one else does. Los Angeles Ballet artistic directors Colleen Neary and Thordal Christensen know that. So for this, the second season, they ordered up two new pieces for their 26 dancers. The first one, "Lost in Transition" by soloist Melissa Barak, debuted at the spring season opener this weekend at UCLA's Freud Playhouse. It is a smart, taut and whimsical winner. Ballet is not baseball, but let's just say that signing "free agent" Barak and bringing her back from Manhattan to her Los Angeles hometown was one of Neary's and Christensen's smartest decisions. Frustrated in the corps de ballet at New York City Ballet, and already an accomplished choreographic craftsman, Barak is blossoming further as a dancer with LAB. With "Lost in Transition," this 20-something advanced, too, as a dancemaker. Her four-movement premiere demonstrated clear purpose and great skill in execution, especially with the corps de ballet. The complicated layers and patterns she knitted for the all-female ensemble continuously surprised this viewer, and then delighted with each succeeding revelation. She gave us a trail of treats to follow using repeated motifs, which guided us gently, not obviously, through the piece. Barak's choreographic "voice" is rooted in the modernism of George Balanchine (like other NYCB alumni), but she is quickly finding her own movement colors and pitch. "Lost" is sleek abstraction, but with warm undertones, just like the (recorded) score, selections from two separate concerti by composer and virtuoso bassist Edgar Meyer. Barak began with an upstage line of women holding hands, their arms raised in a V. Like dominoes, they collapsed through a cascading canon. They pulled into a tight circle, and then burst open like flower petals exploding in fast motion. In the third movement, the corps was clumped in four tiered rows and occasionally burst into mechanistic, syncopated arm signals, a kinetic illustration of the chaotic musical outbursts unexpectedly sprinkled through Meyer's "Double Concerto for Cello and Double Bass." For her lead couples, Aubrey Morgan and Damien Johnson – two sensational newcomers – and Erin Rivera-Brennard and Peter Snow, Barak provided brisk, if less interesting, partnering challenges. But Barak was never timid – when Rivera-Brennard exited at one point, the abandoned Snow wandered sadly about until she returned. A trio for Sergey Kheylik, Lauren Toole and Kelly Ann Sloan was a sassy diversion, filled with loose torsos and rolling hips, big leaps for Kheylik and attacking footwork for Toole and Sloan. Patricia Guillem's neon-colored unitards and Tony Kudner's suggestively mysterious lighting were the appropriate finishing touches to this exciting piece. The program's other three ballets highlighted the many moods of Balanchine. Neary and Christensen spread about the solo parts, coaching every with exactitude. Overall, the dancers were more relaxed and greatly improved from a year ago. The cast approached the radical precision of "The Four Temperaments" (1946), to Paul Hindemith's equally revolutionary score, with still too much severity. But there were also sparks of adventurousness. In the "Melancholic" movement, Kheylik pulled his body to extremes, folding nearly in half forward and backward. His cat-like leaps soared ever upward and yet he still hit the floor, his body flat, on the beat. In "Sanguinic," Corina Gill amped up every inside and outside spin, losing a few, but still making the risks worthwhile. Her dependable partner, Peter Snow, also left caution at the wings and flew through his jumps. The dancers in the "Phlegmatic" section were one-note serious, but Andrew Brader's fluid arms and legs seemed to lengthen and ripple with each wave. The bravura "Tarantella" (1964, music by Louis Moreau Gottschalk) followed "Lost in Transition" on the program – a dessert when one was not needed. But Gill and guest artist Rainer Krenstetter made it the dance equivalent of sweet sherbet, a light entertainment intended only to please. Gill impressed with her pointe work and balance, while Krenstetter's sunny disposition and beautifully articulated beats made him an irresistible presence. The final act was devoted to "Who Cares?" (1970) and the dancers took to the Gershwin songs and the choreography's frothy sassiness with carefree and energetic eagerness. We were glad to see this other side of Los Angeles Ballet.. Barak was a sensuous and sophisticated soloist in "I'll Build a Stairway to Paradise." Despite a few bobbles, Nancy Richer brought lyrical playfulness to "My One and Only." Morgan and guest artist Eddy Tovar filled "The Man I Love Duo" with aching love. The male ensemble sprang with palpable joy. Los Angeles Ballet presented itself in the 600-seat Freud Playhouse, taking the box-office risks on its own shoulders. This same weekend at Royce Hall, UCLA Live was presenting the similarly attractive but inferior State Ballet of Georgia, and audience members commented to me how happy they were to see classical dance on the lineup. This is a ridiculous state of affairs. Los Angeles Ballet is coming up fast. Wake up, you folks at UCLA Live (and all you other presenters around town). Take this young talented group under your wing, because everyone will benefit. Orange County Register by Laura Bleiberg DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Swan feathers float down on local stages | Los Angeles Ballet

    Swan feathers float down on local stages March 14, 2012 Something rare is afoot in Los Angeles. To put it simply, “Swan Lake.” Yes, that icon of classical exactitude and style is popping up on stages all over. And the producer turns out to be not some long-standing, well-endowed enterprise on tour here, but the LA Ballet, which is a mere six years old. Why? Why would brand-name husband/wife directors Thordal Christensen and Colleen Neary be confident enough to mount this behemoth of a ballet? This vast spectacle designed for the likes of kingly companies with multi-millions -- the Bolshoi, American Ballet Theatre, Royal Covent Garden, Royal Danish? Answer: They have the chops now, that is, the dancers, together with their deep, artistic savvy. And they know it. All I did was tip-toe into Royce Hall - the first stop in a city-wide tour of major Southland venues that continues through March 31 - only to discover a production of the Petipa-Ivanov-Tchaikovsky ballet that approximated world-class standards. The capstone of all this cheering came in the second act - you know, the famed lakeside scene, that moonlit mirage with the snowy white swan corps floating about and Prince Siegfried sensing the imminent appearance of his fateful inamorata Odette, aka the Swan Queen, turned from maiden into an avian creature by an evil sorcerer. And when she alit onstage, in the person of Allynne Noelle, the effect was dazzling -- as that first sighting was meant to be. Tall, with perfect proportions and gorgeously tapering long limbs, this Swan Queen had both bird-like spark and human pathos, her hand articulation spelling out regal elegance. She danced with alacrity and definition and fluid musicality. It was as though she’d been in training at Vaganova since adolescence - not a girl from Huntington Beach - although she’d done stints at redoubtable dance oases (National Ballet of Canada, Villella’s Miami City Ballet and not least, Vicky Koenig’s Inland Pacific Ballet). So...with Noelle and a host of others now just in their second season with LAB, Christensen and Neary knew this was their moment. In fact, the bench is deep enough to alternate the lead role, as well as others. But that’s not all. These high-pedigree directors (he a Royal Dane, she a Balanchine Trustee), who have both formerly danced the “Swan Lake” lead roles for years, boast wide contacts for bringing resources to the company -- the dancers, for instance -- and this production, originally designed for Pacific Northwest Ballet. Besides Noelle, who joined LAB only 18 months ago, is Alyssa Bross, the alternate lead. I glimpsed her rehearsing Odile (the Black Swan), and saw richly expressive qualities - she used every enticement to undermine the Prince’s oath to Odette and was a dewy seductress, not the hard, haughty type who would laugh at her easy conquest. And when she danced Odette, it was with aching vulnerability - which belies her photograph on the program book cover, a misleadingly placid look. No wonder Christensen went forward with “Swan Lake.” He knew he’d recruited the talent - many had trained at prestigious schools and had danced with top companies. As Noelle’s and Bross’s partners, both Kenta Shimizu and Christopher Revels acquitted themselves nobly, if not exactly at the danseur level. Guest artist Akimitsu Yahata did his thrilling bravura stuff as the Jester. But down to the last coryphée, the coaching was scrupulous. Everyone had clear focus and a sense of unanimity, even the mimed gestures were natural. What’s more, the muted, old-world sets and costumes looked lovely on the Royce Hall stage, as if made for it. Considering that taped music allows for no moment-to-moment variation, the company coped well. DONNA PERLMUTTER is an ASCAP-Award winning music/dance critic and journalist whose work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times and many other publications. She is also the author of “Shadowplay: The Life of Antony Tudor.” Email her at donna.perlmutter@gmail.com . LA Observed by Donna Perlmutter DOWNLOAD PDF 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • LAB Co-Artistic Directors Receive Lifetime Achievement Award | Los Angeles Ballet

    LAB Co-Artistic Directors Receive Lifetime Achievement Award November 1, 2012 Los Angeles Ballet Co-Artistic Directors Colleen Neary and Thordal Christensen have been honored with the McCallum Theatre Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award. Previous recipients of this award include Julie McDonald, of MSA Agency, Nigel Lythgoe, and Lula Washington. The award will be presented at the 15th Annual Dance Under the Stars Choreography Festival on Saturday, November 10, 2012. To attend the Festival and learn more, visit McCallum Theatre's website. McCallum Theatre ​ READ ARTICLE AT SOURCE 2023/2024 Season > News > Previous Item Next Item

  • Tyler Lambert-Perkins – Lighting Director | Los Angeles Ballet

    2023/2024 Season > Staff > Lighting Director Tyler Lambert-Perkins Available Shortly Next Artist Staff Previous Artistic Staff

  • Santiago Paniagua – Company Dancer | Los Angeles Ballet

    2023/2024 Season > Dancers > Santiago Paniagua Hometown Boston, Massachusetts Seasons with LAB 2021/2022, 2022/2023, 2023/2024 Santiago started dancing at the age of 8 through Boston Ballet's inner city outreach program 'Citydance.' He joined Boston Ballet School soon after and completed his training at 18. He then joined Philadelphia Ballet 2 and was promoted to Apprentice after two years. Santiago joined Los Angeles Ballet in 2021 and is currently dancing his third season with the company. MEET THE DANCERS LOS ANGELES BALLET Repertoire Learn about the comprehensive and varied seasons of Los Angeles Ballet since its debut in 2006. Repertoire includes stunning classical ballets, exceptional stagings of Balanchine repertory, and relevant works by many of today’s most innovative dance-makers. VIEW REPERTOIRE LOS ANGELES BALLET 2023/2024 Season This season includes exciting works by master choreographers Justin Peck, Hans van Manen, Yuri Possokhov and George Balanchine, and another world premiere by LAB Artistic Director, Melissa Barak. Plus, LA's holiday favorite, The Nutcracker. Subscriptions and Single Tickets on Sale Now! DOWNLOAD SEASON BROCHURE

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